The Association of Commercial Television

AN INDEPENDENT ASSOCIATION OF TELEVISION BROADCASTERS WILL BE ESTABLISHED IN 2020 IN SLOVAKIA test

Television and radio broadcasters are planning collaboration on intersecting topics.

There will be a structural change in the Association of Independent Radio and Television Stations (ANRTS) at the beginning of 2020. While television and radio stations are planning to continue collaborating on all relevant media topics, in the future there will be various formal institutions representing both types of media. Commercial television stations decided to establish an independent Association of Television Broadcasters, whose founding members include Markíza-Slovakia, s.r.o., Mac TV, s.r.o. a C.E.N., s.r.o., similar to the Association of Commercial Television (AKTV) in the Czech Republic.

The departure of television broadcast operators from ANRTS occurred by mutual agreement and with the understanding that these media types – television and radio – need to focus on their own development and legislature. Both audiovisual media groups, however, remain in close contact and will support each other in their mutual interests within the scope of media sphere.

The Association of television broadcasters intends to focus upon the legislation of television broadcasting, copyrights, and the formation of a Slovak television market so that these processes are in compliance with European audiovisual legislature. Additionally, it will promote a correct market environment in Slovakia and free economic competition. One of the Association’s key goals remains protection of free speech and free spread of information via television broadcasting. The Association is also planning a close coordination with its Czech partners.

“The Association of Television Broadcasters has a lot of work ahead, but also visions which will guide us to a future meaningful development of television broadcasting. Today nobody doubts that television as a medium is changing and provides many options to choose from. To be able to do that it needs not only energy and investments but, most of all, good legislature and a transparent space to implement its plans,” said Marcel Grega, JOJ Group’s CEO and President of ANRTS.

“Private radio will continue in protecting its interests via the existing Association and we are ready to continue mutual constructive collaboration in the areas that connect us and in which we see mutual interest,” said Ivan Antala, CEO of Radio Express and Vice-President of ANRTS’s Radio section.

Source: http://www.anrts.sk/wp/?p=1181

DON’T CHANGE THE CHANNEL: TV IN ALL ITS FORMS IS KEY TO REACHING YOUR AUDIENCE test

Media buying has traditionally been about blending ingredients together for the perfect marketing mix. But with so many new channels and such fragmented audiences, this age-old recipe is rapidly becoming more difficult to follow. So, what’s to be done?

 The age of total video

TV is complicated these days. In just one household, a family could be watching live TV, streaming, watching downloads and checking out highlights online – all at the same time. They might be using a second screen to chat with friends, play games or send emails too. And of course, this might all be happening on different devices, inside the house and on the go.

TV is evolving with the times and people are watching in myriad ways. It’s digital, it’s on every device – and it’s not held back by a schedule. The rise in online and on-demand video has been stratospheric across Europe: a 2019 report from the European Commission shows four in 10 have a TV and/or film subscription. In Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, revenues from Pay TV and paid VOD (video on demand) rose by 14% to around €4bn in 2018. This is forecast to grow another 13% this year to €4.5bn. Meanwhile, 42% of Internet users in France watch online video content every day, with this rising to 53% in Spain.

This is the age of total video.

Young people love ‘TV’

The reality is that TV is evolving and should be seen as total video. The lines are blurring when you define what it is, from traditional linear broadcast TV, live streaming or VoD. It doesn’t matter what you call it, TV can now be any kind of video content.

The European Commission’s report finds that an enormous 86% of Internet users aged 15–24 say they have streamed or downloaded film and TV content in the last year, alongside 72% of those aged 25–39. As these young people grow up, marketers will need to focus on them as they become the key demographic with purchasing power.

In the UK, OTT services like Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Now TV are increasingly popular, with the new Disney+ slated to be available from November 2019, which will only add to the competitiveness (and the revenues) of this marketplace. There is a clear shift from viewing video content on actual TV sets to watching it on multiple platforms and devices.

We consumers live in the golden age of television. But for marketers, it can be overwhelming. An increasingly fragmented video landscape and novel watching behaviours across devices are prompting marketers to endlessly (and exhaustingly) question and reevaluate their media spend.

Europe leads the way on innovation

The main thing to remember, however, is that it’s a golden age of video for marketers, too.

Of course, with cross-device viewing behaviours, video campaigns must be cross-device too. This requires meticulous planning and a profound understanding of viewing behaviours. But there has never been more insight into viewing patterns which can be used to plan and design campaigns, from the creatives to the messaging. With algorithms to tailor content for consumers, marketers also get a look in at individual preferences and can use this to personalise and deliver the best brand experiences they can.

The market is still adapting to this new total video cross-device reality. Measurement is moving forward in order to cater for all four screens (TV, desktop, smartphone, tablet), but we are still far from having an ideal unified currency to measure all formats.

A simple solution to a multifaceted problem

To solve the headache of cross-device campaigns, marketers should have one unique source to plan, buy and optimise campaigns across all channels, allowing them to deliver what consumers want in a more effective and simple manner. That way, businesses are uniquely positioned to benefit from the era of total video, from new ways of buying and selling video inventory internationally, and from new TV formats which allow them to truly connect with consumers and compete with tech giants. That means less time planning and buying across markets, less spend on creating a different campaign for each market, and therefore more time and money for optimising and tailoring campaigns.

This is what EBX (European Broadcaster Exchange) is doing: addressing the demand for quality online video campaigns at scale, by providing an automated and data-driven way to plan, buy and sell inventory across Europe. It is the biggest European broadcaster exchange, the result of a joint venture founded by Mediaset (Italy and Spain), ProSiebenSat.1 Media (Germany), TF1 Group (France) and Channel 4 (United Kingdom), which together are working to simplify the world of premium video.

TV is increasingly cross-border with new ways of watching appearing every day – each of which represents a new way for brands to connect with new customers. But the digitisation and fragmentation of the media landscape doesn’t have to be a headache. Marketers just need a new recipe book to ensure they are getting the most out of the golden age of TV, just like their customers are. The key ingredients are an understanding of the shifts in consumer trends and all-purpose tools to reach target audiences segments effectively, no matter when, where or how they are getting their telly.

Source: https://www.v-net.tv/2019/10/04/dont-change-the-channel-tv-in-all-its-forms-is-key-to-reaching-your-audience-2/

TOO MANY STREAMING CHOICES LEADS SOME VIEWERS BACK TO TRADITIONAL TV test

Content abounds on streaming services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime Video. But when viewers are faced with too many choices of what to watch, some end up tuning out. 

That’s the main finding from Nielsen’s Total Audience Report from the first quarter of 2019. What some have dubbed the golden age of TV led to 495 original scripted programs across various TV platforms in 2018, per AdAge, but all of these choices might be paralyzing viewers.

Viewers spend just over 7 minutes browsing a streaming service for something to watch, per Axios. Younger adults — those between 18 and 49 — spend 8 to 10 minutes looking for something before calling it quits, whereas older adults give it just 5 minutes. Just over 20 percent who go in unsure of what they want to watch wind up giving up and tuning out, per Nielsen. 

Uncertainty plus too much choice ends up turning many viewers off: Almost 60 percent reported being more likely to go back to favored traditional TV channels if they don’t know what they want to watch via a streaming service. 

Plus, only one-third of adults find the content menus — where content is sorted by category and algorithms are used to make suggestions to viewers — helpful when it comes to figuring out what to watch.

“Content discovery…is crucial to consumers in an era when they’re inundated with ads and content,” Peter Katsingris, Nielsen’s SVP of audience insights, is quoted in the report, per The Drum. “Conversely, these same consumers are connecting to this fragmented content at unparalleled rates — well over 11 hours each day across screens and devices.”

The findings support what researchers have observed when it comes to choice, which is that when faced with too many choices, we revert to what’s familiar. We think we like choices, but too many options leaves us stressed trying to make a decision. 

Seven in 10 homes have a subscription video on demand service, per Nielsen, and more than 70 percent use streaming-capable TV devices. Video viewing through TV-connected devices has increased by 8 minutes per day, reports Deadline.

Axios points out these findings come as even more companies get into the streaming game. Disney is set to launch its streaming service, Disney+, which will offer Disney, Marvel and Star Wars films, and Apple has announced its forthcoming Apple TV+ streaming service, joining Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video and ESPN+.

Some hope to grab viewers by boasting exclusive rights to a beloved show, like NBCUniversal taking “The Office” and WarnerMedia announcing its HBO Max will have every episode of “Friends.”

For those who do know what they want to watch, it can be frustrating to manage the subscriptions needed to watch the shows or content they’re interested in, especially as content arrives and disappears from certain platforms, NPR reports. Some experts believe the best streaming services will rise to the top in the next few years, whittling down the competition. 

Nielsen notes streaming companies might want to refine recommendations and update content menus to better appeal to users. 

Media research data indicates people will spend a total of about $38 a month on streaming services, per the Wall Street Journal

Source: https://www.bizjournals.com/bizwomen/news/latest-news/2019/07/too-many-streaming-choices-leads-some-viewers-back.html?ana=RSS&s=article_search&+Marketing%29

EGTA’S CEO SURVEY – A TV AND RADIO ADVERTISING INDUSTRY IN TRANSFORMATION test

Results of an exclusive egta survey confirm top management’s expectations for the industry.

Over 100 CEO’s and senior executives from surveyed egta members – leading TV and radio sales houses across Europe and beyond – expect growth in ad spend for both Total Video and Total Audio in the next three years. An exclusive survey carried out by the Brussels-based trade association sheds light on the continued transformation the advertising industry is expecting.

Opportunities ahead lie in targetability and personalisation

With change comes opportunity. Approximately 88% of respondents perceive targetability – enabling advertisers to pinpoint their target markets – and personalisation – creating relevant and unique experiences that hold attention for longer – as a priority for their company in the coming years.

Other particularly important growth areas highlighted by senior executives are streaming/online audionew ways for audiences to access content (additional screens and devices), new sources of data shared by advertisers and or telco providers, and addressable TV.

Reaching audiences where they are today

While opportunities abound on the horizon, senior executives also identified some of the challenges they foresee in this changing media landscape. More than 80% of C-suite executives state that they are relentless in their attempt to reach audiences where they are today – thus making up for the decline in linear TV ratings. Their focus is on building the right infrastructure that will allow today’s TV to compete with international online platforms and speed up the process around the identification and adoption of cross-platform measurement solutions.

Shaping the future of advertising

77% of TV members and 78% of radio members are positive about the future advertising market. Optimism remains – if slightly higher this year compared to two years ago – that both the Total Video and Total Audio ad markets continue to grow.

Broadcast TV and radio currently remain by far the biggest advertising revenue sources for broadcasters. However, respondents aim for online to take a larger share in the future. Approximately 90% of C-suite executives believe that advertising on online properties will represent a greater proportion of their revenue sources by 2022.

Commenting on the results of the survey, Katty Roberfroid, egta’s Director General said: “The homogeneity in the results we received from a vast majority of select top executives does show the way forward. If we are to future-proof today’s TV and radio’s business, both on air and online, we must continue to cooperate and innovate on all fronts: infrastructure, formats, measurement, and more. This will help advertisers reach the consumers around the premium content they love – in an always brand-safe environment that is respectful of their experience and privacy.”

Several CEO’s who participated in the survey added their comments:

“If we – as an industry – are to compete against international online platforms, it is all about competing on content, and collaborating on tech, currency, measurement and more. This common sense will help us create a truly seamless total video experience for both advertisers and users.”

Malin Häger, Sales Director & Chief Commercial Officer, TV4 Sales

“In an age of audience, it’s all about finding new ways for listeners to access the great content we have in abundance. In this battle for time and attention, Total Radio embraces innovation with plenty of opportunities with regards to personalisation, podcasting, streaming, on-demand radio and more – which will all contribute to a growing advertising market.”

Saskia Schatteman, Chief Executive Officer, VAR

“We need to experiment and continuously push the envelope with regards to targetability, personalisation and more to advance our industry. As addressable advertising is going to vary per market, we need to dig deeper into the data value, the return on investment and the scalability.”  

Christian Kurz, Senior Vice President Global Consumer Insights, Viacom

“We’re living in an era where it’s no longer about linear or non-linear TV. When we’re in contact with marketers every day, we see they’re overwhelmed with solutions and fragmented media. We need to be the guiding light that helps them find the audiences where they are today, helping advertisers and their brands as a trusted partner with insights in this Total Video ecosystem.”

Stéphane Coruble, Chief Executive Officer, RTL AdConnect

“For us at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the bar is set high. As streaming video grows and younger viewers move online, we’ve been incessantly innovating to follow audiences online – as a multiplatform player amid fast-changing viewer habits. In our unique position, bridging the US and European market, we’re focussing on building the right infrastructure as we expect more revenue from online in the coming years.”

Jean Mongeau, General Manager & Chief Revenue Officer Media Solutions, CBC/Radio-Canada

Source: http://www.egta.com/?page=press-release-individual&idRelease=631

EXPOSING THE BLACK HOLE OF ONLINE VIDEO ADVERTISING test

There were lots of interesting things to catch the eye in the Advertising Association/Warc annual adspend figures for 2018 – not least the rapid growth of Broadcaster VOD advertising, up 29% to £390m and forecast to grow at a similar rate for the next two years. Total TV investment was stable year on year at £5.1bn.

But what really caught my eye, and then violently thrust my eyebrows up several notches, was the amount of adspend now going to online video.

In 2018, it was £2.3bn, up from £1.7bn in 2017. Take BVOD’s reported £390m away from that and you have a non-broadcaster online video ad market in the UK of £1.9bn – 26% of the total video ad market.

Why the raised eyebrows? Well, when you compare this share of video adspend with the relative share of video ad viewing, everything gets weird. Very weird, indeed. And eye-wateringly expensive.

TV including BVOD accounts for 95% of video advertising time, according to analysis of industry data.

Online video such as YouTube, Facebook and the long programmatic tail together account for 4%. Cinema is the remaining 1%.

In other words, the average person watches 17 minutes of TV advertising a day (the 95%) and one minute of non-broadcaster online video advertising (the 4%).

Yet AA/Warc figures show that £1.9bn was poured into that single minute a day and £5.1bn into the 17 minutes.

That means 4% of video ad viewing took 26% of video adspend; the other 95% of video ad viewing took 70%.

How are your eyebrows doing? Mine have escaped my forehead and are heading for the skies. And we haven’t even factored in the quality of the different ad exposures; this is purely based on quantity of advertising seen.

Let’s turn this into the comparable measure of cost per completed views. Online video ads are usually priced on a cost-per-start basis, but that is obviously the lowest of benchmarks, so let’s look at the average cost for 30 seconds of video ad viewing for a meaningful like-for-like comparison:

As you can see, the average cost across TV advertising (linear and BVOD) for 30 seconds is just over £6. For non-broadcaster online video, it goes up to a whopping £45.

So, the potentially brand-unsafe, often small-screen, often partially viewable world of online video costs advertisers seven times more than TV. This doesn’t sound like value for money.

How has this happened? How is this black hole sucking in such a disproportionate amount of money?

What seems likely is that advertisers are often making decisions about online video based on its superficially attractive cost per view (start), rather than assessing the price based on completed views.

What to do? First, please return my eyebrows to me if you see them. Second, I would suggest advertisers request a detailed breakdown from their agencies of the like-for-like cost per completed (human) viewable view in their audiovisual mixes. If their eyebrows can take it.

Source: https://www.thinkbox.tv/news-and-opinion/blogs/exposing-the-black-hole-of-online-video-advertising/

TV ADS STILL MORE RELEVANT TO CONSUMERS THAN STREAMING VIDEO ADS test

What does this say about programmatic video ads?

Despite marketers’ efforts with advanced programmatic and data targeting for video ads, consumers still find that they are more likely to be served a relevant ad on linear TV.

According to a survey conducted by Adobe in February 2019, 49% of US internet users said that TV was one of the mediums where they were most likely to see a relevant ad, while just 12% said the same about streaming video.

Valuable ad placements and the ability to reach a mass audience have kept TV ads relevant in the digital age. But digital video allures marketers with advanced targeting through programmatic advertising, which uses audience data that TV doesn’t have.

This year, we estimate $29.24 billion will be spent on programmatic video ads—accounting for 81.2% of digital video ad spend. For TV, just 4.0% of ad spending in the US will be programmatic.

There are many perceived advantages to programmatic advertising, most of which revolve around lower costs and the ability to harness data. In response to a November 2018 survey by Digiday Research, 56% of US agency and brand media buyers said that increased targeting and optimization was the biggest advantage of programmatic advertising. But if viewers still find TV ads to be more relevant, then programmatic may not be as effective as some marketers perceive it to be.

Consumer sentiment does indicate that ads are becoming more relevant overall. In the Adobe study, 46% of consumers felt that the ads they saw currently were more relevant than those they were served a year prior. But, most marketers can agree, there’s still a long way to go before personalization is perfected.

Only 32% of marketers believe their industry is delivering personalization effectively, according to a survey conducted in February and March 2019 by Evergage and Researchscape International. When asked how satisfied they were with the level of personalization in their own marketing efforts, 50% said they were either not satisfied or slightly satisfied, and 34% said they were moderately satisfied.

While marketers may have faith in programmatic’s potential to target the ultraspecific, it is possible that the accuracy of the data just isn’t sufficient—and that’s why these ads aren’t resonating with viewers.

Many marketers would agree, per the Evergage/Researchscape International report. Nearly half of respondents (45%) felt they didn’t have sufficient data and insights for effective personalization.

Source: https://www.emarketer.com/content/tv-ads-still-more-relevant-to-consumers-than-streaming-video-ads

THE ASSOCIATION OF COMMERCIAL TELEVISION CELEBRATES ITS 2ND BIRTHDAY; PRIMA’S MAREK SINGER IS INCOMING PRESIDENT test

The Association of Commercial Television (AKTV) has completed the second year of its existence during the course of which it continued to develop its strategic marketing and legislative activities.  The most remarkable activity of the past year was a marketing conference for TV advertisers and advertising agencies featuring a marketing super star, Australian professor Mark Ritson. In the field of European legislature, AKTV actively joined the process of creating a Copyright Regulation and, in the Czech Republic, it has been involved in the preparation of the transposition of The Audiovisual and Media Service Regulation (AVMSD) since its inception. After the expiration of the two-year term, there will be a change in AKTV’s president; Prima’s Marek Singer will replace Nova’s Jan Vlček. 

Prague, March 29, 2019 – As a part of its activities, The Association of Commercial Television focuses on eliminating prejudices against television, which are common among advertisers. To bring exceptional and respected global speakers to the Czech Republic, AKTV organized the Boost Your Media Performance conferencein fall, 2018. Its main star was one of the most remarkable marketing gurus of today, Australian university professor and marketing expert, Mark Ritson. Other speakers included the research leader form the British marketing association Thinkbox, Nicole Greenfield-Smith, and Jakob Stigler, the co-founder of Mano, an agency which creatively connects advertisers, agencies and media. 

In addition to marketing education, AKTV also focused on the legislative process – both at the national and European levels. Some of the most important areas of focus are: Copyright Regulation; Audiovisual and Media Service Regulation, and ePrivacy Regulation.

AKTV’s marketing and legislative activities coincide through its presence in the Chamber of Commerce, where it is one of the founding members of the Cultural and Creative Industry section.

ONLINE BUSINESSES ARE BIGGEST TV ADVERTISERS test

Collectively, online businesses are the biggest category of advertisers on TV in the UK, accounting for almost 15% of total spending via this channel in 2018 and 40% more than the next biggest category which is food.

Latest figures from Thinkbox indicate Amazon, in particular, boosted its TV spending by 21% to £60m last year as it promoted its Alexa voice assistant, putting it in the top three advertisers, behind Procter & Gamble (£169m ) and Reckitt Benckiser (£79m).

The top 5 biggest spending categories on TV in 2018 according to Nielsen’s data were:

 

  1. Online businesses: £760m (7% up year on year)
  2. Food: £534m (3% down)
  3. Cosmetics & Personal Care: £437m (1% up)
  4. Entertainment & Leisure: £380m (no change)
  5. Finance: £378m (18% up)

Thinkbox also observed 867 new or returning (after a gap of at least five years) advertisers on TV, possibly encouraged by the fact that the average cost per thousand (CPT) for broadcast TV ad views, at £5.13, was 21% cheaper in real terms than 10 years ago.

This figure, Thinkbox clarified, only includes TV advertising that is watched from start to finish at normal speed; TV ads that are seen during any fast-forwarding are free to advertisers.

“TV advertising put in a strong performance in 2018 given the challenging economic environment,” said Lindsey Clay, Thinkbox CEO.

“We are seeing signs of money moving back to TV from lower quality online environments which can’t guarantee a safe environment for brands,” she added. “It is a testament to TV’s continuing power to deliver that a company like Amazon, which understands its customers so well, is using TV to power its success.”

Total TV advertising in 2018 amounted to £5.11bn, representing all money invested by advertisers in commercial TV in the UK across all formats and screens: broadcast TV spot and sponsorship, Broadcaster VOD, addressable TV, interactive TV advertising, and product placement.

Source: https://www.warc.com/newsandopinion/news/online_businesses_are_biggest_tv_advertisers/41834

IT’S TIME TO LOOK AT TV ADVERTISING IN A NEW LIGHT test

While addressable TV has been talked about in certain industry circles for some time, it seems the wider marketing industry has yet to truly appreciate its potential.

With new, head-turning channels and marketing approaches launching all the time, it can be easy to overlook the transformation other media channels have undergone, especially those around for a long time.

For the past year, ISBA has been working with its TV and AV Steering Group to fully understand this innovative advertising technology, get to grips with the opportunities it offers and get a heads up on what’s over the horizon.

Opening up TV to new advertisers

Addressable TV appeals to existing TV advertisers looking to combine linear TV’s broad reach with the targeted capabilities of addressable TV advertising. Which leads us to the real pro: addressable TV lets them reach niche audiences or test specific groups of consumers and how they react to new marketing campaigns.

In addition, it also enables brands who could not previously afford to advertise on TV, the ability to do just that – allowing SMEs to add TV to their marketing mix and target consumers they want to reach.

A new landscape

Previously TV and web technologies were considered separate elements, often planned and bought completely separately or even by different marketing teams. Yet when people watch TV, increasingly it will be on a digital device and often online or interactively.

The TV and advertising landscape of today includes digital broadcast and IP linear channels, closed format on-demand, web-on-demand, short-form, and interactive TV formats.

Addressable, data-rich TV advertising is emerging as a new advertising platform and our industry must be able to review and debate the media landscape, evolving right in front of us. To do this, all players need a clear understanding of the TV distribution and advertising technology and be precise in their use of an agreed TV and advertising terminology.

Demystifying

With the arrival of Addressable TV, comes the inevitable new language that surrounds it. But as we wade through the wording and attempt to define ‘what it’s going to do for me’, it becomes clear that the lack of real information as to the possibilities is the bigger issue.

Bobi Carley, who has recently joined ISBA, is very vocal about ensuring innovation follows demand “We need the advertiser’s voice to be recognised as a principle stakeholder in the shaping of this key market as it matures to ensure it does so in a way that meets needs”.

To this end, we have worked with Nigel Walley at Decipher (and were supported by Sky) to produce our guide to addressable TV, The Emerging Context for TV Addressibility. We hope it will start to fill the education gap among marketers allowing them to play an informed role in how Addressable TV develops.

The future

Addressable TV is now at the point where this debate can happen and the industry needs all players to be sufficiently informed to join in.

To date, Addressable TV’s scale has been limited, however, in the UK this is undergoing rapid change. Sky Adsmart, for example, is currently the only product in the marketplace and continues to evolve in 2019 with Virgin Media households being added to the Adsmart footprint in April and with YouView due to be added later in the year.

As we continue down the addressable route, the industry will be watching in anticipation for ITV and Channel 4’s plans.

In the past, broadcasters have tended to work in isolation. ISBA welcomes the increased collaboration between Broadcasters and would encourage continued investment in the growth of Addressable TV to deliver solutions to advertisers at scale.

 

Source: https://www.thedrum.com/opinion/2019/02/04/it-s-time-look-tv-advertising-new-light

TV AND DIGITAL ADVERTISING NEED TO STOP FIGHTING AND ADMIT THEY NEED EACH OTHER test

Like two siblings vying for a parent’s attention, digital and traditional advertising have been fighting for advertisers’ attention since digital came of age in the post-dot-com bubble era. Many have portrayed this as a war between generations, where the old guard “just didn’t get it.” But this shouldn’t be seen as a battle of relevance between old and young or a battle for the billions of dollars of media that advertisers spend. Because the losers in a war of this kind are not just the advertisers, but also the consumers they serve.

While we all should acknowledge the rise of digital advertising as a strategic media channel in an advertiser’s arsenal, the more beneficial point of view is one where we get rid of the “zero-sum game” model where one wins and the other loses. Instead, we should take an “additive” point of view, where advertising itself evolves and new tools and perspectives develop to meet advertiser and consumer needs.

This need to evolve can no longer be ignored by the old guard, as the young upstart digital has finally usurped TV as the dominant advertising media by spend. In 2017, digital marketing overtook television advertising for the first time. According to reports, TV advertising generated $178 billion worldwide with digital reaching $209 billion

While the great marketing divide debated traditional vs. digital and old vs. new, TV and digital marketers went to battle by picking sides. However, actual consumer consumption trends don’t support this. According to the August 2018 Nielsen report, people are actually watching more — not less — media, especially when you factor in consumption on tablets, smartphones and the web. On top of that, adults in the U.S. actually spent more time watching live TV each day (16 minutes more) in 2018 than they did in 2017.

Have we thought about media usage wrong and, in turn, are making decisions because it’s been a “one or the other” mentality?  

Done right, television can provide the scale and memorability that advertisers are after. Based on compiled data from The Global TV Group, TV reaches nearly every person on the planet in the course of a month, with 90% being reached each week. It’s this reach that makes TV such a powerful form of advertising. TV not only helps you reach a large audience, but you also can reach the right audience via behavioral targeting. If you think TV is only for traditional brands, think again. New-age brands, like Fitbit and Airbnb, have seen immediate and significant increases in digital engagement (measured by site traffic) once they started advertising on TV.

“The reality is Google doesn’t motivate a search. It simply enables it. No one randomly types in the name of a brand, product or service. It all starts somewhere else. To see the big picture, one must look at these cross-media connections. You need to focus on the synergies, not the divisions, that exist between TV and digital … The more we think about Google as a destination and less as a starting point, the better we’ll understand its connection to television,” said Bill McCabe, president and CEO of Eicoff in a March 2018 blog post.

A Google study on TV’s impact on search in 2010 and updated in 2017certainly acknowledges the correlation between the two as well. And Google’s groundbreaking work on Zero Moment Of Truth and micro-moments reinforce that search is growing, but ignore the “stimulus” that drives search, even though it is clearly part of the model.

Television’s scale and awareness are undeniable, and digital provides unmatched precision. In fact, we’re seeing more companies, including our own, focus on merging broadcast TV ad performance and digital engagement. Based on data on how a TV ad is performing via digital engagement, advertisers can adjust search advertising bids and budgets and identify broadcast opportunities for improvement. Moreover, you can gain insights into your ideal customer with granular data on who is interested in your product, brand or company. This detailed view of who is interested provides an opportunity for companies to drive engagement. You can encourage your audience to interact with you and draw them in.

For those that want to start an armistice between TV and digital advertising within their own organizations, here are a few great first steps:

1. Improve cross-team communications. Encourage your digital team to ask the TV team about their media strategy and attend a TV media-oriented conference and vice versa.

2. Find a web analytics solution (in addition to Google Analytics) that gives you access to visitor-level data that can be exported for analysis.

3. Request TV media clearance reports at the spot level with date, time, creative and market data for each spot run.

With this data and free data analysis tools (like Google Data Studio), you can begin to quantify basic “lift” generated by TV and start exploring other ways to proactively use this data to activate new campaign strategies.

TV’s scale and digital’s precision are better thought of like peanut butter and jelly: better together. The latest Facebook IQ study shows that direct correlation. This study observed the everyday behavior of U.S. TV viewers and revealed that 94% of those studied had a smartphone “at the ready” nearby while watching TV.

So, come on, TV and digital, it’s time to stop the feud and work together and add your strengths for the greater good. Television, you build credibility and scale that drives digital engagement. Digital, you supplement TV with microtargeting on additional touch points like paid search engine ads, audience retargeting, display ads and social media.

When you both grow up and realize that you both support and need each other, advertisers, consumers — frankly, all of us — will be better off.

 

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesagencycouncil/2019/01/31/tv-and-digital-advertising-need-to-stop-fighting-and-admit-they-need-each-other/#44aab542e15e

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